Collect.com Launches Premier Jewelry Auction

Exceptional Burmese jadeite and items from the Stuart Freeman Collection in Collect.com Auctions’ Premier Jewelry Auction now open for bidding

IOLA, Wis. – An exceptional Jadeite collection and items from the Stuart Freeman collection are just some of the 627 remarkable lots now open for bids in Collect.com Auctions Premier Jewelry Auction. A free, full color catalog is available for download at Collect.com/Auctions. The auction closes Nov. 11.

Jewelry specialist Kathy Flood, in partnership with Collect.com Auctions, has compiled a blockbuster sale stocked with fine jadeite, fine costume jewelry including, diamond, silver, gold, celebrity couture, as well as Victorian, Art Deco and cameos.

 

Kathy Flood is a respected jewelry dealer and author of Warman’s Costume Jewelry, Warman’s Costume Jewelry  Figurals. She has worked for The Collecting Channel, Chicago Tribune as an antiques and collectibles columnist, and as editor of other collectibles publications.

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Rare Honus Wagner Card Found in Safe Deposit Box

 

102710 MLB Honus Wagner card IA

Sister Virginia Muller had never heard of shortstop Honus Wagner.

This damaged Honus Wagner card is expected to fetch a six-figure sum at auction.

But she quickly learned the baseball great is a revered figure among collectors, and the most sought-after baseball card in history. And thanks to an unexpected donation, one of the century-old cards belongs to Muller and her order, the Baltimore-based School Sisters of Notre Dame.

The sisters are auctioning off the card, which despite its poor condition is expected to fetch between $150,000 and $200,000. The proceeds will go to their ministries in 35 countries around the world.

The card is part of the T206 series, produced between 1909 and 1911. About 60 Wagner cards are known to exist.

A near-mint-condition T206 Wagner card sold in 2007 for $2.8 million, the highest price ever for a baseball card. Muller remains aghast that the 1 1/4-inch-by-2 1/2-inch piece of cardboard could sell for even a fraction of that.

"It just boggles your mind," Muller said. "I can't remember a time when we have received anything like this."

The brother of a nun who died in 1999 left all his possessions to the order when he died earlier this year. The man's lawyer told Muller he had a Honus Wagner card in a safe-deposit box.

When they opened the box, they found the card, with a typewritten note: "Although damaged, the value of this baseball card should increase exponentially throughout the 21st century!"

The card was unknown to the sports-memorabilia marketplace because the nuns' benefactor had owned it since 1936.

It has a big crease in the upper right-hand corner, and three of the white borders have been cut off. It has also been laminated. But even in poor condition, a T206 Wagner card is prized by collectors, said Chris Ivy, director of sports auctions at Heritage Auction Galleries in Dallas, which is auctioning the card.

"The T206 set is known as 'The Monster' among collectors. It's just really tough to complete the entire set," Ivy said. The Wagner card is "one of those that's always sought-after, always desirable, and there's not a big population of them. Even in a lower grade, they do have quite a bit of demand and command a strong price."

Wagner, nicknamed "The Flying Dutchman," played for 21 seasons, 18 of them with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He compiled a .328 career batting average and was one of the five original inductees into baseball's Hall of Fame.

The card was printed during the prime of Wagner's career, but the American Tobacco Company ended production soon after it began. Some say Wagner didn't want to promote tobacco products to children. Others believe it was a dispute over money that led to the card being pulled.

On the card, Wagner appears stocky and pale, with his hair parted down the middle and the city on his jersey misspelled: "Pittsburg."

The auction ends Nov. 4, and the highest bid was $60,000 as of Wednesday morning.

Muller is making frequent checks to the Heritage Auction Galleries website - an unusual practice for someone who's taken a vow of poverty. But potential bidders should know that the sale of the card will help people worldwide.

"The money that we receive from this card will be used for the many School Sisters of Notre Dame who are around the world, who need support for their ministries for the poor," Muller said.

 

 

 


 

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To Have And To Hold

 

To kick-off the Every Object Tells a Story© Antique Trader Magazine challenge, is the story of a long forgotten old steamer trunk, purchased during an estate sale, which had been gathering dust for years in a remote corner of a basement.

 

The trunk, a vintage Vuitton, with the signature Louis Vuitton monogram dotting the canvas, dated from the great era of ocean liners. The outside labels, from the White Star Line, told an intriguing tale of where the trunk had been in its life. But what kind of long forgotten treasure might it reveal on the inside?

 

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Upon coaxing open the rust encrusted lock, a sumptuous gown of satin, chiffon, and European lace, began to unfurl. This cherished possession was worn once and then tucked away and for posterity.

 

Perhaps no other garment better symbolizes one of life’s most special moments than a wedding gown. Weddings mark the occasion of joining two individuals in a ceremony of celebration, and incorporate a wealth of traditions which are handed down from one generation to the next.

 

As with the trunk in which it was discovered, this exquisite wedding gown held yet another secret all of its own. Carefully sewn into the satin hem of the dress was a hand written note from a mother to a daughter that read, “Farewell to the bride! May your path through life be strewn with thornless roses…”Could this gown be restored and worn by a future bride who would embrace the personal significance of this special costume?

 

Bridal gowns are among the most popular heirlooms that are passed down from generation to generation. So, what other heirlooms do we value most? We collect what we value, pass on what we prize, and keep what gives us comfort. Be sure to return to visit my Antique Trader Magazine blog to find out about more about some of the other most common heirlooms, and why we treasure them.  

I see objects spark passion in people every day. What stories do your objects tell?   Do you have a major treasure on your hands? A historical relic? An antique car? A gown worn by a top celebrity? A baseball thrown by a hall of famer? A sketch by a famous artist? Or maybe just an old, obscure item that feels like it could be really valuable? Television land beckons! Send me your best object story together with a digital image. Tell me about your wondrous, unusual, forgotten and famous treasures at: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 


 

 

carolineJoin us on facebook and twitter-logo
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Every Object Tells a Story© – Enter Caroline Ashleigh’s Blog Challenge

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Caroline Ashleigh Appraisers & Auctioneers is looking for people who have an item or antique with a great story that they would like me to share in my Antique Trader Magazine blog.

 

I see objects spark passion in people every day. What stories do your objects tell?   Do you have a major treasure on your hands? A historical relic? An antique car? A gown worn by a top celebrity? A baseball thrown by a hall of famer? A sketch by a famous artist? Or maybe just an old, obscure item that feels like it could be really valuable? Television land beckons! Send me your best object story together with a digital image. Tell me about your wondrous, unusual, forgotten and famous treasures at: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 


 

carolineJoin us on facebook and twitter-logo
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All Dressed Up and Some Place Fabulous To Go!

Rotary_Antiques_Show

 

It's show time on Saturday, November 6, 2010, when I will be appraising at the Rotary Vintage Antiques & Collectibles Show in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Come visit and bring me your treasures between noon and four. 

Watch my live television interviews on Friday, November 5, 2010 on WZZM 13 ABC "Take Five" where I will be doing on-air appraisals at 9:00 a.m., and also on October 29, 2010 on Wood TV - Chanel 8 - "8 West" at 11:00 a.m where I will be talking about my new book.

 

Sponsored By: Rotary East Charities
Donating to West Michigan
Non-profits since 1973

DeltaPlex
Delta Plex Arena & Conference Center
2500 Turner Ave. NW
Grand Rapids, Michigan 49544

 

 

 


 

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The Numbers Are In And ArtPrize Wins

The numbers are in, and they prove what everybody already knows -- a lot of people liked ArtPrize 2010

ArtPrize is a 19 day international urban art competition held in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ArtPrize is unusual both for the large size of the top prize ($250,000, combined with other prizes cummulatively amounting to half a million dollars), as well as for the method of judging entries. There is no juror. The works are voted on by the public using modern networking technology.

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Top Ten Winner: Beili Liu is a Chinese-American artist who makes use of thousands of hand spiraled coils on suspended red thread

 

 

 


 

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Custer's Last Flag at Little Bighorn - Will it fetch $5M?

 

 flag134 years ago, General George Armstrong Custer, the 'pride' of Michigan, led the 7th Cavalry into battle against the Lakota Sioux and the Northern Cheyanne near the Little Bighorn River in Montana. It was not Custer's finest hour. All 210 men under his immediate command died in the massacre. So did Custer. As the battle detail surveyed the carnage a few days later, a swallow-tailed American flag, known as a guidon, was found hidden beneath a dead soldier. That flag was later sold to the Detroit Museum of Art on 1895 for $54. Now, 115 years later, the Detroit Institute of Arts has decided to sell Custer's Last Flag at auction this fall at Sotheby's in New York for an estimated price of 2 to 5 million dollars. Because there are no direct comparables to the Custer flag in the auction record, estimating a price certainly involves a bit of hocus-pocus and intuition. In the end, the allure still comes back to Custer, an enormously complex figure, ambitious, flamboyant, eccentric. His legacy, the subject of many books, has seesawed from gallant warrior to military fool to racist symbol of anti-Indian hatred. Custer, however, wasn't just an Indian fighter, he was one of the first self-made American celebrities. An icon of the west, he did not survive - but his flag did. The question now is - how will the flag survive the gavel in December?

The Culbertson Guidon, 1876
est. $2,000,000-$5,000,000
Sotheby’s New York
Dec. 10, 2010

by Caroline Ashleigh


 

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Marilyn Monroe Seven Year Itch Poster, 1955

 

 

 

 

Marilyn Monroe




They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This image reportedly was responsible for the break-up of the marriage between Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio. The shocker in this famous skirt blowing scene is not that her panties show, but that Marilyn confessed (for publication) that she was never much for wearing any at all. This original poster is one of 1,000s of items of memorabilia in Debbie Reynolds' Hollywood Motion Picture Museum to be auctioned by Christies next year.









 

 


 

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Marilyn Monroe's White Dress from the Seven Year Itch, 1955

 

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Caroline Ashleigh and the Fishers in front of perhaps the most famous dress in the world, Marilyn Monroe's "subway dress" from the Seven Year Itch




Marilyn Monroe - perhaps the most famous movie star in recent memory - and her famous white dress from the Seven Year Itch, shown in background of this photograph - is considered to be one of the greatest movie costume icons of all time. I had the privilege of appraising this dress, among many others at Debbie Reynolds' Hollywood Motion Picture Collection Museum, on Antiques Roadshow, FYI.

The designer of this piece, Travilla, requested that instead of being cremated, his remains be pleated, just like Marilyn's famous dress.







 

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The Final Curtain Goes Up, As The Auction Hammer Goes Down, On Debbie Reynolds' Collection

 

 

by Caroline Ashleigh, AAA, USPAP

 

Whoever and wherever you were - whether a shoe shine boy from the Bronx or a waitress in a donut shop in Duluth – you went to the movies. You saved your money to sit in a darkened theater to become, of only for a little while, Rudolph Valentino in Blood and Sand, Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, or Marilyn Monroe in the Seven Year Itch.

 

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Caroline Ashleigh and the Fishers in front of perhaps the most famous dress in the world, Marilyn Monroe's "subway dress" from the Seven Year Itch

In 2005, I had the privilege of examining and appraising the costumes from those movies, and many more, when I visited Todd Fisher, Debbie Reynolds' son and the CEO of the Hollywood Motion Picture Collection in California. This collection, valued at over 50 million dollars, includes items from almost every Academy Award winning film, from the era of the silent movies, through the present. It is estimated to be the largest private collection of Hollywood costumes and memorabilia in the world.

 

Ms. Reynolds was the visionary who amassed this collection from all of the major studios for over thirty years. She had a passion for the collection and preservation of film history, and the influence that the American film industry has had on the world.

 

These dazzling mementos are part of our collective cultural heritage and consciousness, and, as such, we owe Ms. Reynolds a huge debt of gratitude. For over thirty years, she has been the keeper of the dreams. As these treasures of glitter, shine and glory are now about to be sold off at auction, let’s hope that the new custodians will honor, preserve, and cherish this geniune American art form, as much as their predecessor treasured them.


 

carolineJoin us on facebook and twitter-logo

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